2001: USA2 beat Norway in the Bermuda Bowl Finals


S O L U T I O N S
to the quiz I set
(260 subscribers then)

Three of the problems below were decision that Norway got wrong. Should they have managed just two right, the world cup was theirs!   Of course, they are not clear-cut decisions....  

Let us see how you fare...

Problem 1

1087
KQJ10
10
 AKQ82

Board 2: and you are vul. East passes and you open 1C and partner responds 1NT showing 7-10 points.

Your rebid?


S o l u t i o n

  KQ2
765
 QJ87
753
 
J95
 A942
 K952
106
 A643
83
A643
J94
  1087
KQJ10
10
 AKQ82
 

Helgemo rebid 2 and played there for +110.

In the other room, the Norwegian East opens a mini NT! South (Alan Sontag) bids 2NT, presumably 15-18, and Peter Weichsel raises him to 3NT. +630 after a diamond lead and a spade switch.

Net result: +520 to USA2.
+11 IMPs.

If you rebid 2H, your luck is in as partner jumps to 3NT.

Score -11 IMPs if you didn't

Feedback via Email, 5-Nov:

"...on the first problem, Sontag's 2NT was not "15-18". It showed four hearts and a longer minor, and did not guarantee anything like the strength he possessed. Weichsel, who did not alert 2NT his side of the screen, may or may not have remembered what it meant.

David Burn
London, England"



Thanks, David! :)


Problem 2

Q87
AJ7
K43
 7643


 A943
 Q108
 AQ65
 A10

You are vulnerable again and there is a pass from your RHO. The bidding is swift: 1NT - 2NT - 3NT by you. The lead is the 10 (lower of touching honours) and you win with the ace in hand.

What do you play at trick 2?


S o l u t i o n

  Q87
AJ7
K43
 7643
 
 K52
 43
 J10987
Q52
 J106
 K9652
2
KJ98
   A943
 Q108
 AQ65
 A10
 

Net result:
+600 +100 = +700 to USA2. +12 IMPs.

Lew Stansby, for USA2, won the J lead in hand, and promptly advanced a spade. Tor Helness took the spade king third time round, and found a club switch to Geir's king but Lew ducked this. Lew takes the next club with the ace, as Tor unblocks the Q. After cashing the 13th spade and the diamonds, Geir gets endplayed with the club, to concede the 9th trick to dummy's hearts. +600.

In the other room Glenn GrÝtheim (the problem) wins the 10 lead, and runs the 10. A club shift now cooks declarer's goose.


If you started on spades, score a wash board.

Score -12 IMPs if you didn't
Feedback from Newsgroup rec.games.bridge, 5-Nov:

I'm not sure you posed the right "problem" on "Problem 2". Maybe Geir Helgemo could/should have found the play of the club jack at trick five, instead of the king? Then the contract can be defeated.

If South showed a strong notrump, West can't have the club ace, so playing the jack instead of the king seems pretty safe. Of course it's easy for us to see it now, looking at all four hands.

David desJardins


Leif Stabell, of Zimbabwe, also pointed that out.

Well spotted, guys!


Problem 3

 J75
 J95
 K5
 AQ952


- -
 A10643
 J10864
 KJ10

At love all, you open the hand 1 in first seat, aggressive as you are, and partner bids 4H. All Pass. Lew Stansby (playing with Chip Martel) leads the 10.

You can get to dummy twice in clubs, praying that the clubs break favourably, and you can double-finesse in trumps. Even if you find a trump honour with Chip, this will yield 9 tricks only though. A diamond trick must be established now, right? Both declarers led a diamond at trick 2.

Do you play a diamond to the king, or do you finesse?


S o l u t i o n

   J75
 J95
 K5
 AQ952
 
 Q10932
 K8
 Q93
876
 AK864
 Q72
A72
43
  - -
 A10643
 J10864
 KJ10
 
Net result:
+420 +100 = +520 to USA2. +11 IMPs.

With nothing to guide him except that the spade ace was on his right, Glenn GrÝtheim played a diamond to the king, and suffered more spade forces. 2 Down.

In the other room, it went Pass-Pass- and Chip opens 1. Geir overcalls 1 - 2 by Lew - 3 by Tor Helness. In 4, the same lead was received, and Lew decided that the finesse was necessary. He was right.



If you ran the 10, score a wash.

Score -11 IMPs if you didn't

Post in Newsgroup rec.games.bridge on 7-Nov by Bill Shutts:
"Re problem 3, (on reflection, after I got it wrong in the quiz). Spades are much more likely to be 5-5 than the distribution table says since nobody bid. If Spades are 5-5, West is probably limited to a flattish 8 or ugly 9 HCP. Even with the Spade Ace marked with East, he should hold at least 45% of the remaining high cards, and could hold a lot more. As a cross check, I would expect intervention with the West hand holding the Diamond Ace vs. the Queen, possibly with the Heart Queen vs. the King. So in this case it looks like running the Diamond J or 10 is better. I believe that playing to the Diamond King is better in many superficially similar situations. Tough luck for the Norwegians."


Problem 4

They are vulnerable.

You are on lead holding:

 KQ86
 972
 J1092
 K9

The opponents have a relay sequence in getting to 6. You are playing against a pair that can ask for specific Jacks! Suffice to say that declarer shows a 17+ hand, and dummy shows 8-11 points and a 4-4-4-1 distribution precisely with a shortage in clubs. Declarer did all the asking.

What do you lead to 6?


S o l u t i o n

   AJ107
 J854
 Q765
 7
 
 KQ86
 972
 J1092
 K9
 5432
 3
K83
 QJ863
  9
 AKQ106
 A4
 A10542
 

Peter Weischel duly led a trump on the auction given. After some crossruffing, declarer claims -1. He was unlucky that the clubs were not 4-3.

In the other room, the Americans stopped in 4 and manage to make +2 as he could ruff four clubs in dummy on a non-trump lead (K was led).

Net result:
+100 +680 = +780 to USA2. +13 IMPs.

If you led a trump, score +13 IMPs

Score -13 IMPs if you didn't

With any other lead the slam makes, and the score swings from +13 to -13 (-1430+680) and Norway would have won the world title by 5 IMPs!!



Final Score of the 2001 Bermuda Bowl
USA2 : 286       Norway : 265

This page was originally posted 4-November-2001